Music instructor receives a grant from the U.S. Department of State’s Citizenship Diplomacy Action Fund


Dr. Lori Keyne, music instructor and Fullbright scholar alum, received a $4435 grant from the U.S. Department of State’s Citizen Diplomacy Action Fund. “I feel honored, proud, and humbled toDr. keyne be awarded this grant,” said Dr. Keyne. “The grant will be used to provide virtual binational art performances during the COVID-19 pandemic to help build community resilience.”

The public is invited to join us for the first online concert. The virtual event will be streamed on the Bi-National Arts Institute’s website www.binationalarts.org  at 7 p.m. MST  on Tuesday, September 15. “The project is a collaboration with the Bi-national Arts Institute, the Mexican Consulate in Douglas, Cochise College, the cities of Douglas, Agua Prieta and Naco, UNAM in Tucson, some departments from U of A and other regional entities,” added Dr. Keyne. “There will be participants from southern Arizona, northern Sonora, Mexico, and Japan in the virtual event.”

The virtual concert showcases renowned Japanese baritone Shingo Sudo as a soloist for the choral piece, “Custodia,” with words by Octavio Paz and music by Dr. Keyne. The public will also enjoy singers from Japan, Cochise County, Pennsylvania, Mexicali, Hermosillo, and Agua Prieta. Two dancers from Sonora will create movement to express the concrete image of a mandala with which Paz created his work. “The work speaks of caring for each other and creates symbols of what we share with the use of female and male images,” said Dr. Keyne. “The dancers will be wearing masks to symbolize this time in our world.”

“We are thrilled that our U.S. alumni, like Dr. Keyne, are using the skills and knowledge they gained during their exchange programs overseas to join the worldwide effort against COVID-19,” said Marie Royce, Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. “These Citizen Diplomacy Action Fund public service projects uplift communities and provide them with resources and education needed to fight the pandemic.”

“My deep hope is that the connections we make while we create these projects together will enrich all of our communities during COVID-19 and continue to build lasting relationships where we can collaborate,” explained Dr. Keyne. “COVID-19 has brought a tragic, difficult time to our world. However, with the creative use of technology, we can be together, lift one another’s spirits, still sing, and make music.”

For more details about the virtual concert visit binationalarts.org.